Natural Gas Matters

I was driving through Pennsylvania on Friday afternoon this past week, and I was pleasantly surprised to hear the show Natural Gas Matters on 590 AM. If you are in Pennsylvania, I would recommend you tune in on Fridays at 3:15 p.m. This show helps answer the common questions and concerns that people have about natural gas. You can read more about it here.

Will New York Ever Allow Hydraulic Fracturing?

The New York Post asks a good question today about hydraulic fracturing:

Will hydraulic fracturing ever come to New York?

And if it does, will it be sufficiently commonplace to actually boost Upstate’s sadly dilapidated economy?

These are fair questions — given that the Cuomo administration has slowed the approval process for the controversial natural-gas-extraction method to a crawl.

And now comes word, via a careful leak to The New York Times, that Team Cuomo is pushing a plan that would severely limit both the number of drilling permits and their location to just a few counties.

And even that assumes that the process itself is approved by the Department of Environmental Conservation — which is still a mighty big if.

The article notes rightly that many depressed counties are missing out on a huge economic boom that would almost certainly result from the dwilling of wells, “Meanwhile, Upstate remains in desperate need of the economic revival that a vigorous fracking effort would bring.”
You can read the full article here.

Read more: http://www.nypost.com/p/news/opinion/editorials/an_endless_stall_5jsbpf6lPgHmyPLqN7eIjN#ixzz1xnKPG8tS

Propane fracturing set to begin in New York’s Marcellus shale

From the Star Gazette with hat tip to The Shale Blog:

Fracturing shale with propane is a developing technology proposed as an alternative to traditional high volume hydraulic fracturing, a process that uses sand and a proprietary chemical solution, or diesel fuel. Drawbacks to traditional hydraulic fracturing include the large quantities of fresh water required -– several million gallons per well — and like amounts of waste produced, including brine and organic solvents.

Chevron has used Gasfrac’s proprietary process of fracking with liquefied petroleum gas (LPG) in its $7.3B Piceance basins natural gas project. The company’s 2011 annual report supplement noted that the technology is recognized by the World Shale Gas Conference for its economic and environmental performance potential, and “significantly increases production while minimizing water usage.” The company is continuing to test the process. Chevron’s assessment of LPG fracturing is the strongest endorsement yet of the process by major company. Continue reading